A few words at the end of 2016

It is easy as a commentator on events to assume that we have a unique perspective or insight that people will benefit from reading. After all, if we didn’t believe our opinions were of interest we would hardly be sharing them. But what is often forgotten when we write pieces is the reader themselves. It is easy to fixate on the issues which we are passionate about, to analyse every scrap of detail under the most forensic microscopes we are able to acquire and to wax lyrical on the importance of the issue we are discussing. What it is harder to do is to create something that is relevant, that is interesting, that is inspiring and that is thought provoking. It is for this reason that the default subject of articles often becomes current events and specifically critiques of current politics, people and passions. But while this may be easy and often immensely enjoyable for the writer, it often leaves the readers despondent, overwhelmed and occasionally depressed.

It is partly for these reasons why I think that people have found 2016 such a challenging year. As our world develops increasing ways to communicate with each other faster and in greater detail, it becomes easy to get lost in the noise. In fact, part of what has made 2016 so difficult is how ingrained our habits of checking social media and our phone have become. Instead of using communication to supplement our lives, it has increasingly taken over our lives. Try for a week to count how many meals or meetings you attend where attendees place their phone on the table before the event has even started and consider how many would have done so 10 years ago. It may well be understandable in the context of the world we live in today, but the fact that it has become understandable and that our obsession with constantly accessing information has become rationalised, is also part of the problem. It is important to know what is happening in the world and to know what is happening in our communities, but what people have forgotten is that life moves on regardless. There are no shortage of years where American’s have elected a president, convinced that the electoral system has failed and the candidate will be a disaster, nor are there a shortage of events where major referendums have been forecast to doom entire nations. But these events, while seemingly seismic in nature, often fade quickly into the background for most people, with the challenges they create becoming quickly assimilated into most people’s daily routines.

At the end of 2016 many people are still lost in the noise of Brexit, Trump, Paris, Berlin, Aleppo, Prince and the scores of other events that have left markers this year. But what we shouldn’t lose sight of is the fact that slowly but surely, changes have been happening in the world that are making it better too. At the end of this year the world will have made its first real commitment to keeping carbon emissions below 2 degrees centigrade and the world will have invested more in installing new energy from renewable sources than fossil fuels (the first time since before the industrial era). The world also will have seen the largest single philanthropic endowment of over $100bn from wealthy individuals to fight climate change.

On gender, the proportion of women in finance, notably venture and private equity, will have more than doubled in the last decade. Women’s sport numbers continue to rise, with over 700 million people watching the women’s world cup last year and in the armed services, women will be seen in more active combat roles than at any time in modern history. In politics, the UK has its second ever female Prime Minister, alongside a female German Chancellor and 22 other female world leaders, the highest number in recorded history. On race, we have had the first ever black president of the United States and the UK has its first ever Pakistani mayor of London, with Romania almost electing a Muslim PM for the first time in the country’s history.

On poverty, world poverty and world extreme poverty continue to decline, as does access to energy and access to medication. Technology is also changing people’s lives in profound ways that we take for granted in the west. For the first time this year, Burma has been able to store anti-snake venom across the countryside thanks to renewable technologies and energy storage, a vital innovation in a country with the world’s highest number of snake related fatalities (1.4 per 100,000 people). We also now have developed a cure for ebola and drugs that allow individuals with HIV to have sex without protection, with no risk of passing the disease onto their partners.

There are certainly many more such stories. Perhaps only small and incremental in many cases, but cumulatively they are changing our world for the better. But we risk forgetting about these changes, or even worse, ignoring these advances, if instead of carrying on with our lives we instead fixate on the few issues that constantly catch the headlines.

So at the end of 2016 and the start of the new year we should all consider a piece of advice from older British history, a piece of advice now seen across the world, “Keep Calm and Carry on”. It may not be glamourous and it is certainly clichéd, but during the Blitz in Britain people carried on with their lives regardless of the perilous and fluid environment around them. People knew that major events were unfolding, but they also recognised that the main determinant of their own lives were not the actions of governments but the decisions they took themselves as individuals. That message is one I want share again for the new year’s.

The world is scary and chaotic, but we as individuals determine what role that will play in our lives. So, enjoy your drinks at New Years, the potential hangovers the next day and remember in 2017, whenever you feel overwhelmed, that life still moves on even when your social media is exploding. And when it is, try turning off your phone!

Happy New Years all!

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