The Myth of “The United Petrostates of America”

Firstly my apologises for the delay in writing another article. It has been a busy few days, but now back to the title!

On Monday the well-known US publication, Foreign Policy, published an article on how the US would be transformed by the advent of Shale gas and become The United Petrostates of America (for the link click here). Of course this assertion is absolutely laughable.

Firstly the advent of US Shale will not lead to massive exports of Oil and Gas from the US because other domestic US energy sources (Coal, traditional oil + gas wells) are declining and also because other developing nations like China, India and Brazil have a plethora of other less politically sensitive sources of Petroleum products they can access.

Secondly, the US Petroleum industry primarily exists to service the production of US goods for US consumers and whether that is for transport needs (in a vast territory with poor public transport) or heavy industry like Chemical manufacturing, Ship building, Car building, etc. In short the US does not export what it needs at home and so does not get the boost in its trade figures with other states.

The Last error however is the assertion that the export of Shale oil & gas will boost the strength of the dollar. Now assuming the author of Foreign Policy by some miracle is correct, this is not the reason why the US dollar is strong against other currencies, it is because the Dollar is the world’s currency reserve. The value of the US dollar is high because in times of insecurity people put their money in Dollars because of the long held belief that the US will not default on its debts. Excluding those who write about the decline of the US from a position of desire not knowledge, and the mythical “Credit-ratings agencies” (if they even still deserve that name) people trust the US to pay and are almost blind to any other considerations, see the decline in US 10yr bond yields when the US had its Triple A rating cut for the first time.

In addition the US debt (now in excess of USD$14 Trillion) is, contrary to popular belief, largely held by Americans. The citizens of the US and global investors now the US will pay its debts because over $9 Trillion of that debt is owed to fellow Americans. Thus the incentive to default on citizens and institutions of the state itself is, in essence, non-existent.

All of these things combine to a very simple point that seems to be missed in the US discussions of Shale gas, what is the US net increase in Energy supplies? If we look at the historic growth in US natural gas over a 20 year period, we see that consumption of gas in the US rose from 19.17 TcF in 1990 (from all Sources) to 24.09 TcF in 2010. To put it more simply, between 1990 and 2010 US gas demand grew by 25%, yet over the same period the US production of natural gas only grew at 21% (17.81 TcF to 21.58 TcF). To add to this even further, the growth in US gas supply between 2012 and 2032 is predicted to increase at an even slower level of 15% over the whole period.

Thus the key point is that US Shale Gas is not a “Bonus” to US energy supplies, rather it is the critical lifeline preventing them from a huge collapse. According to the EIA the US is expected to increase its supply of gas (as mentioned above) from 23.65 TcF of gas (from all sources) in 2012, to 27.27TcF from all sources by 2032 but if the growth in gas demand increases by the same factor as it did between 1990 and 2010 then there will be a net deficit.

Last thoughts to add here: if the US population grows by 15% between 2015 and 2035 (prediction from US Census) and Obama and Republicans want to see the US boost domestic manufacturing to boost their exports (despite the growth in gas demand occurring during a decline in US industry), will the US still have to import gas even with Shale?

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2 thoughts on “The Myth of “The United Petrostates of America”

  1. Pingback: ‘The View From Lawrence Street’ by Christopher Jackson | The Vintage Magazine – Save the Best for Last

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